TLD Launches Guide to Local Food in Southeast Michigan

Press Release, Tricia Phelps

Screen Shot 2016-07-07 at 2.08.10 PM

Date:               July 7, 2016

Contact:          Tricia Phelps, tricia@localdifference.org (847) 809-7643

New Guide to Local Food for Southeast Michigan

Ann Arbor – Taste the Local Difference®, Michigan’s local-food branding and marketing program, will publish its TLD Guide to Local Food in Southeast Michigan starting Thursday July 14th, 2016. The new magazine-format guide will cover nine counties across the region.

Taste the Local Difference® (TLD) has become an iconic brand, helping to market and sell local food in Michigan for more than a decade. Its mission is to “help food businesses and the communities they serve benefit from the economic value of local food while making fresh, healthy, local food available to all.” TLD first appeared in 2004 as a small booklet listing farms and restaurants in five counties around Grand Traverse Bay. Since then it has grown to include a robust set of online, mobile, and print resources for local food businesses across the state. Its annual Guide to Local Food magazine will now have a special printing for Southeast Michigan.

In 2016, TLD began offering its services to the local food community in Washtenaw County through an ACT 88 economic development grant.  TLD has since expanded those services to eight other counties including Oakland, Macomb, Wayne, Monroe, Ingham, Livingston, Jackson and Lenawee counties. The new TLD Guide to Local Food in Southeast Michigan will include maps and listings of farms, farmers markets, and food businesses, making it easy for consumers to find locally grown and produced food.

In addition to the nine counties represented in the southeast Michigan guide, TLD also covers all 15 counties in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, 11 counties in northeast Michigan and 10 counties in northwest Michigan, totaling 45 counties across the state in two publications with a circulation of 80,000 copies.

Inside the thirty-six page guide, consumers will find maps and listings of hundreds of farms and local food businesses. There are also directories of farmers markets, community-supported agriculture (CSA) farms, locally made beverage businesses, and stories about the people and organizations creating a thriving local food movement in southeast Michigan.

Beyond the guide, TLD offers a basic set of marketing resources to farms, farmers, and farmers markets at no cost. Additional marketing support can be added using an inexpensive fee-based system. Value-added food producers, food hubs, restaurants, retail stores, markets, wholesale distributors, schools, hospitals, and other large businesses can also benefit from TLD’s local food marketing strategies. All of this is available at a very reasonable cost, scaled to meet the needs of each business.

The TLD Guide to Local Food in Southeast Michigan will be available to the public free of charge starting on July 14th, 2016.  Magazines may be found at participating farm stands, farmers markets, grocery stores and visitor centers.

For more, information, please contact Tricia Phelps at (847) 809-7643, tricia@localdifference.org, or visit http://localdifference.org.

 

                                                                 ###

For a print-ready version of this media release click here.

Taste the Local Difference® is a social enterprise of the Traverse City-based Groundwork Center for Resilient Communities. For more than 20 years, Groundwork has focused on three areas to create stronger, more vibrant, and resilient communities: transportation, clean energy, and food and farming. Groundwork’s Taste the Local Difference® program is a recognized leader in developing new models for local food systems in Michigan and elsewhere.

Ending Food Waste – Feeding People

Bill Palladino, Food Policy, food waste

FoodWasteHero2

The amount of food wasted in our nation is stunning.

 

“In the United States, 31 percent — or 133 billion pounds — of the 430 billion pounds of the available food supply at the retail and consumer levels in 2010 went uneaten,” according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

From the point of view of a food business, this statistic erodes already slim profit margins. The USDA goes on to say, “the estimated value of this food loss (in 2010) was $161.6 billion using retail prices.” To bring that down to earth for us, here’s a quote ‘80’s television icon Mr. T, “That ain’t no chump change!”

Taste The Local Difference® Launches Magazine in Partnership with MyNorth Media

Press Release

MyNorth TLD MagazineMay 15, 2015 (Traverse City, MI)—Taste the Local Difference launches its 2015 Guide to Local Food in Northwest Michigan. MyNorth Media partnered with Taste the Local Difference to realize the 50-page publication that connects readers to Northern Michigan’s vibrant food community with the mission to sell more locally grown and made food. 

Healthy Eating with Third Coast Bakery

Farmers Markets, Specialty Producers, Stories, Tricia Phelps

By Tricia Phelps

As we embark on a new year, many people are voicing aspirations of change & resolution for the months ahead. I love food too much to even think about grandiose plans for dieting, but I can’t help feeling lethargic after the past few weeks of excessive food & drink. To break in the New Year, I want to introduce Third Coast Bakery—“The new wave of baking” that will help you avoid unhealthy eating this year, while still satisfying your sweet tooth.

Edible Gifts for the Holiday

Find Local Food, Retail, Stories, Tricia Phelps

By Tricia Phelps

Local edible gifts are easy to find if you know where to look. They make great gifts for food lovers near-and-far and can be personalized for nearly anyone in your life. Northern Michigan has access to numerous local, high-quality food producers whose products are unique and widely sought-after. As the gift-giving season is upon us, we would like to take this opportunity to highlight a few local businesses that make edible gift-giving easier than ever before.

BOOK REVIEW: Michael Pollan’s “Cooked”

Bill Palladino, Book Reviews, Books/Films, Food Policy, Learn More

By Bill Palladino

“Alone among the animals, we humans insist that our food be not only ‘good to eat’ —tasty, safe, and nutritious— but also, in the words of Claude Levi-Strauss, ‘good to think,’ for among all the many other things we eat, we also eat ideas.”  

Pressmeister Oils – Local and Different

Bill Palladino, Coupon, Farmers Markets, Retail, Stories

By Bill Palladino

“Since oils have the most aroma and nutrients when they are fresh, cold-pressed and unrefined, it helps to grow and press them locally. But it turns out, some of the crops we don’t even grow anymore close by—even though we could. We’ve lost the knowledge and infrastructure.” – C. Milz

Non-GMO Oils for Your Kitchen from Local Farms

Economy, Farmers Markets, Retail, Specialty Producers, Stories, Tricia Phelps

By Tricia Phelps

“The focus for Grand Traverse Culinary Oils is keeping it local.” – W. Koucky

Grand Traverse Culinary Oils, owned by William Koucky of Traverse City, just released bottles of their locally grown, locally produced canola and sunflower oils. The cold-pressed oils are made with non-GMO seed, grown here in northern Michigan.