TLD Launches Guide to Local Food in Southeast Michigan

Press Release, Tricia Phelps

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Date:               July 7, 2016

Contact:          Tricia Phelps, tricia@localdifference.org (847) 809-7643

New Guide to Local Food for Southeast Michigan

Ann Arbor – Taste the Local Difference®, Michigan’s local-food branding and marketing program, will publish its TLD Guide to Local Food in Southeast Michigan starting Thursday July 14th, 2016. The new magazine-format guide will cover nine counties across the region.

Taste the Local Difference® (TLD) has become an iconic brand, helping to market and sell local food in Michigan for more than a decade. Its mission is to “help food businesses and the communities they serve benefit from the economic value of local food while making fresh, healthy, local food available to all.” TLD first appeared in 2004 as a small booklet listing farms and restaurants in five counties around Grand Traverse Bay. Since then it has grown to include a robust set of online, mobile, and print resources for local food businesses across the state. Its annual Guide to Local Food magazine will now have a special printing for Southeast Michigan.

In 2016, TLD began offering its services to the local food community in Washtenaw County through an ACT 88 economic development grant.  TLD has since expanded those services to eight other counties including Oakland, Macomb, Wayne, Monroe, Ingham, Livingston, Jackson and Lenawee counties. The new TLD Guide to Local Food in Southeast Michigan will include maps and listings of farms, farmers markets, and food businesses, making it easy for consumers to find locally grown and produced food.

In addition to the nine counties represented in the southeast Michigan guide, TLD also covers all 15 counties in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, 11 counties in northeast Michigan and 10 counties in northwest Michigan, totaling 45 counties across the state in two publications with a circulation of 80,000 copies.

Inside the thirty-six page guide, consumers will find maps and listings of hundreds of farms and local food businesses. There are also directories of farmers markets, community-supported agriculture (CSA) farms, locally made beverage businesses, and stories about the people and organizations creating a thriving local food movement in southeast Michigan.

Beyond the guide, TLD offers a basic set of marketing resources to farms, farmers, and farmers markets at no cost. Additional marketing support can be added using an inexpensive fee-based system. Value-added food producers, food hubs, restaurants, retail stores, markets, wholesale distributors, schools, hospitals, and other large businesses can also benefit from TLD’s local food marketing strategies. All of this is available at a very reasonable cost, scaled to meet the needs of each business.

The TLD Guide to Local Food in Southeast Michigan will be available to the public free of charge starting on July 14th, 2016.  Magazines may be found at participating farm stands, farmers markets, grocery stores and visitor centers.

For more, information, please contact Tricia Phelps at (847) 809-7643, tricia@localdifference.org, or visit http://localdifference.org.

 

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For a print-ready version of this media release click here.

Taste the Local Difference® is a social enterprise of the Traverse City-based Groundwork Center for Resilient Communities. For more than 20 years, Groundwork has focused on three areas to create stronger, more vibrant, and resilient communities: transportation, clean energy, and food and farming. Groundwork’s Taste the Local Difference® program is a recognized leader in developing new models for local food systems in Michigan and elsewhere.

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Part-time TLD Position Opening

Get Involved, Learn More, Tricia Phelps

date released: March 9th 2016

Local Food Coordinator Position (part-time)
Magazine Distribution, Building Healthy Communities (BHC) Grant Opportunities
Location: Northwest Lower, Michigan. Office: 1610 Barlow Street in Traverse City, MI
Start Date: ASAP

Our Mission:
“Taste the Local Difference® helps food businesses and the communities they serve realize the economic value of local food, while ensuring that healthy, local food is available to all consumers.”

About Taste the Local Difference® (TLD)
Taste the Local Difference is a local food marketing agency providing a vast array of products and services to Michigan’s local farmers and food businesses. TLD is a community resource and product identifier for local food— meaning the work we do helps consumers to find local food, in stores and throughout the community.

TLD consults with a variety of businesses including retail stores, hospitals and other institutions, about sourcing more local, healthy food options. These local-food consulting services provide value to businesses not only through staff education, procurement strategy development and promotion, but also through simple economics.

Responsibilities
The Local Food Coordinator Position is responsible for assisting the TLD Operations Director in business consultations about local, healthy food purchasing. The coordinator will make initial food assessments, strategize with Operations Director on possibilities for improvement, and help promote new initiatives once implemented.

Collecting information from various stakeholder groups about the needs and requests for new marketing materials will also be a requirement. The Local Food Coordinator will work with the Operations Director, and the Brand Manager to develop new materials. These materials will then need to be placed in-stores by the Local Food Coordinator and monitored for rips, tears or alterations. The Coordinator will be representing TLD in the community, interfacing with retailers, and interacting with consumers. The successful candidate is expected to be knowledgeable, professional and above all friendly.

TLD also produces an annual print publication that serves as a free community resource. Distribution of the 2016 Guide to Local Food in northern Michigan will also be a responsibility of the Local Food Coordinator. And therefore a car will be required for this position.

 The position will require a commitment of 20-30 hours per week. It is an entry-level position.

Preferred Experience

  • Retail or Service Industry
  • Bachelor’s Degree
  • Optional & Encouraged: Food Production or Farming

 

Desired Qualities

  • Task-Oriented
  • Motivated
  • Friendly
  • Self-Starter
  • Organized

Requirements

  • Valid driver’s license
  • Access to vehicle

Compensation:

This is a part-time position. Hourly rate is $12.00/hr.

TLD will pay a mileage rate for use of employee’s own vehicle.

 

CONTACT:
Tricia Phelps
TLD Operations Director
tricia@localdifference.org
231.941-6584

Interested candidates should send a cover letter describing their interest along with a resume of their work and school experiences.

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Deadline for TLD’s 2016 Guide to Local Food

Find Local Food, Press Release, Tricia Phelps

For Immediate Release

Date:  January 26, 2016

Contact: Tricia Phelps, tricia@localdifference.org, 231-941-6584 ext. 716

Taste the Local Difference® Partner Sign-up & the 2016 Guide to Local Food Deadline

Taste the Local Difference® (TLD) is a local food marketing agency based out of northwest Michigan. For over twelve years they’ve been promoting local farmers and food producers through the power of collective branding and storytelling. TLD differentiates local product on store shelves and throughout the community to ensure consumers consider the local options they have when making purchasing decisions.

001_TasteLocal2015.jpgOne of the ways TLD promotes local food in the community is with their annual print publication, The Guide to Local Food- published in partnership with MyNorth/Traverse Magazine. This guide is a free resource for the community and is distributed in grocery stores, community libraries, visitors bureaus and hotels.

In 2016 TLD will distribute 50,000 copies of The Guide to Local Food— they’ll be doubling it’s size and adding content to cover all thirty-seven counties of northern Michigan, including the upper peninsula. Only TLD Partners are listed in the Guide which helps consumers to connect with local food & farms.

The deadline to sign-up as a TLD partner and get your business listed in the 2016 Guide to Local Food is February 1, 2016— less than a week away.

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Homemade for the Holidays

Get Involved, Learn More, Tricia Phelps

The holiday buzz is here— covered in tinsel and flooding your inbox with cyber sales. But a look past the shiny, brash exterior reveals an activity at the heart of the season: gathering together with friends and family.

What brings us all together this time of year?

Well, food.

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The Local Food Economy

Economy, Learn More, Tricia Phelps

Local food has become a burgeoning industry over the last few years as more consumers begin to question where their food is coming from. While it’s true that ‘local’ was popular decades before the rapid globalization of our food system, the local food industry we see today is actually a new one with different players, complexities and market opportunities that make it unique. That is why, at least for now, there is only limited data available to help explain what’s happening.

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Fall into Good Habits

Find Local Food, Retail, Tricia Phelps

We form habits, and we depend on them nearly every day because they make our busy lives easier.

Now, as summer transitions into fall, we have the perfect opportunity to develop new habits that affect our health and wellbeing in positive ways. The food we eat, and therefore our health, is strongly impacted by our food purchasing habits–What better way to develop those habits than by changing the way we shop?

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Grilled Peach & Heirloom Tomato Salsa

Recipes, Tricia Phelps

Ripe peaches on the grill simply scream summer. The natural sugars in a peach are taken to an entirely new level when placed over the flame. Homemade salsas are a quick and easy way to bring together the best local produce the season has to offer. With gorgeous heirloom tomatoes, flavorful cucumbers and sweet juicy peaches we have the base of a delicious summer fruit salsa. Toss in some homegrown cilantro and a bit of locally produced Cilantro Jalapeño Sunflower Oil and you’ve got yourself a naturally refreshing sweetness paired with the perfect kick.

This recipe features local produce from VerSnyder’s Fruit, Providence Organic Farm & Shiloh’s Garden as well as locally produced oils from Grand Traverse Culinary Oils.

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Interested in Food Preservation?

Event, Get Involved, Learn More, Tricia Phelps

We’re giving away a chance to have fun and learn. That’s right, you heard me! You have a chance to attend a free class of your choice with ISLAND’s Preservation Station (Blanche- for short) thanks to TLD. A class with Blanche will teach you the basics about food preservation, get you excited about preserving food in your own kitchen, and to top it off you’ll get to take home some tasty eats to enjoy next week or a few months from now.